The Do You Know Resilience Scale

Click here for a Workbook for Kids based on the DYK Scale (below)


The Do You Know Scale

Please answer the following questions by circling “Y” for “yes” or “N” for “no.” Even if you know the information we are asking about, you don’t need to write it down. We just wish to know if you know the information.

Y     N    Do you know how your parents met?
Y     N    Do you know where your mother grew up?
Y     N    Do you know where your father grew up?
Y     N    Do you know where some of your grandparents grew up?
Y     N    Do you know where some of your grandparents met?
Y     N    Do you know where your parents were married?
Y     N    Do you know what went on when you were being born?
Y     N    Do you know who chose your name?
Y     N    Do you know some things about what happened when your brothers or sisters were being born?
Y     N    Do you know which person in your family you look most like?
Y     N    Do you know which person in the family you act most like?
Y     N    Do you know some of the illnesses and injuries that your parents experienced when they were younger?
Y     N    Do you know some of the lessons that your parents learned from good or bad experiences?
Y     N    Do you know some things that happened to your mom or dad when they were in school?
Y     N    Do you know the national background of your family (such as English, German, Russian, etc)?
Y     N    Do you know some of the jobs that your parents had when they were young?
Y     N    Do you know some awards that your parents received when they were young?
Y     N    Do you know the names of the schools that your mom went to?
Y     N    Do you know the names of the schools that your dad went to?
Y     N    Do you know of a relative whose face “froze” in a grumpy position because they did not smile enough?



Score: Total number answered Y.

More than 10 "Y" answers correlates positively with a resilient person. 

Important Note: (from website below) About that last question! Fifteen per cent of our sample answered “Yes!” This is because the stories that families tell are not always “true.” Often, they are told in order to teach a lesson or help with a physical or emotional hurt. As such, they may be modified as needed. The accuracy of the stories is not critical. In fact, there are often disagreements among family members about what really happened! These disagreements then become part of the family narrative. Not to worry!

From: https://www.huffingtonpost.com/marshall-p-duke/the-stories-that-bind-us-_b_2918975.html


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